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FRENCHMANS CAP

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  • FRENCHMANS CAP
  • Donaghys Hill
  • Lake Whitham

 

Enchanted Valley tasmania

1/ This shows a beautiful vista of the well named Enchanted Valley from the lookout on the A10 Lyell Highway on the way to the Frenchmans Cap Trail. It shows you how mysterious the area really is.

King Williams Saddle Tasmania

2/ This shows the Mount King William Saddle covered by cloud. Clouds are frequent in the area.

King Willaims Saddle Tasmania

3/ This photo shows the same King William Saddle later on the same day, when it was cloud free.

Mount Mullen tasmania

4/ The closest mountain is Mount Mullen. From here you can get a good view of the Frenchmans Cap.

Frenchmans Cap Tasmania

5/ From one point on the A10 Lyell Highway you can see this distant view of the Frenchmans Cap on the left.

Frenchmans Cap Tasmania

6/ The Frenchmans Cap is located in the Franklin Gordon National Park. It is a difficult 4 day walk to the Cap and is only for experienced walkers.

Frenchmans Cap Tasmania

7/ The trail begins by crossing the Franklin River. Only one person can cross at a time.

Frenchmans Cap Tasmania

8/ This photo shows the clear waters of the Franklin River in high summer.

Frenchmans Cap Tasmania

9/ The trail to the Frenchmans Cap is through dense virgin forest. Often the trail becomes muddy.

Frenchmans Cap Tasmania

10/ The trail also passes through some button grass meadows, where you see good views of the surrounding mountains.

Frenchmans Cap Tasmania

11/ This photo shows Mount Alma. It was taken from near the top of Mount Mullen.

Frenchmans Cap Tasmania

12/ This is a telephoto view of the Frenchmans Cap taken from Mount Mullen. It was over 20 kilometres away.

Frenchmans Cap Tasmania

14/ This photo shows the Frenchmans Cap from about 10 kilometres away. Note the ethereal atmosphere of the mountains.

Frenchmans Cap Tasmania

15/ This photo shows another view from closer to the Frenchmans Cap.

 

King William Range in central Tasmania

1/ This is a photo of the King William Range. It was taken from a field just off the A10 Lyell Highway West of Derwent Bridge. There are a series of lookouts on this road and all are well worth a stop.

Franklin Hills near Donaghys Hill in Central Tasmania

2/ This photo shows part of the Franklin Hills. It was taken from a field just off the A10 Lyell Highway. Beyond these hills are some of the most spectacular peaks in Central Tasmania.

Franklin Hills near Donaghys Hill in Central Tasmania

3/ This photo shows a break in the Franklin Hills. It was taken from a field just off the A10 Lyell Highway. Beyond the Hills is the spectacular sight of the Frenchmans Cap.

Donaghys Hill in Central Tasmania

4/ This is part of the Donaghys Hill Lookout walk. It is graded at level 2 and the return time is 40 minutes. The spectacular views from the lookout are shown below.

Franklin River Valley from Donaghys Hill in Central Tasmania

5/ This is the awesome view across the Franklin River Valley. The very high peak on the right is the famous Frenchmans Cap, shown in close up below.

Frenchmans Cap from Donaghys Hill in Central Tasmania

6/ This is a telephoto view of the Frenchmans Cap. It was taken from 17 kilometres away at Donaghys Hill. The Frenchmans Cap is a rare half dome shaped peak that glows in the sunlight. It is a massive 1440 metres high.

Donaghys Hill in Central Tasmania

7/ This is the view to the North of the Donaghys Hill Lookout. The valley is covered with button grass.

Mount Alma seen from Donaghys Hill in Central Tasmania

8/ This is a view to the North East of Donaghys Hill. It shows Mount Alma, which is 890 metres high. Peeping over the top of it is Mount Gell.

Goulds Sugarloaf from Donaghys Hill in Central Tasmania

9/ This photo looks towards the North and shows Goulds Sugarloaf and to the left Pyramid Mountain, which is 1260 metres high.

 

Franklin River

1/ This gallery shows a trip that our club made to Lake Whitham in the summer of 2013. They journeyed most of the way to the Frenchmans Cap, then diverged south on the spur line of Mt Agamemnon and Mt Philps to view Lake Whitham and other lakes. Their journey took three days. This gallery should give you some idea both of the challenges and the rewards of visiting the remote wilderness of Tasmania. The image above shows the bridge across the Franklin River, which was the first obstacle, they crossed.

Frenchmans Cap

2/ The next obstacle they crossed was the Franklin Hills. From here you get your first view of the mighty Frenchmans Cap. It is a half domed shaped peak that rises 600 metres above the surrounding terrain. The exposed white quartzite gives the Cap a strange white glow that makes it a truly magnificent sight.

Loddon Plains

3/ In the next stage of their journey they traversed the Loddon Plains. These are referred to as the "sodden Loddon", as rain frequently turns the track into mud. This section has recently been upgraded, but there is still plenty of mud.

Mt Mullens

4/ They journeyed south east along the Frenchmans Cap Trail. This image looks back to the north at Mt Mullens, which was one of the mountains they passed beneath. They then crossed the Loddon River to reach Lake Vera, where they camped. There is an emergency shelter at Lake Vera and there is another emergency hut north of the Cap at Lake Tahune.

Mt Agamemnon

5/ The next morning they left the Frenchmans Cap Trail and diverged south to follow the spur line of Mt Agamemnon and Mt Philps. This image shows the rugged terrain that they were climbing. It looks back to the east at Mt Mullens.

Lake Vera

6/ This image looks back to the north east at Lake Vera. I had to enhance the original image, as much of it was in a deep shadow. The emergency shelter is at the top right of the lake. The trail to the Frenchmans Cap follows the further shore line.

Mt Agamemnon

7/ This image looks south towards Mt Agamemnon, which was the highest point that they had to reach. It shows the steep terrain that they had to climb to reach the spur line. There was no trail to follow, but, fortunately, much of the spur line was devoid of vegetation.

Mt Agamemnon

8/ This image shows the spur line that they had just traversed. You can see how the vegetation cover is either sparse or non existent. This makes walking easier, but the negative side is that you are exposed to freezing winds.

Mt Agamemnon

9/ This view looks south towards the summit of Mt Agamemnon, which is on the distant left of this image. In the valley ahead was Lake Marilyn. Unfortunately, the cloud that you can see in the distance soon engulfed us and severely limited our vision.

Mt Agamemnon

10/ This image shows our group looking down at Lake Marilyn, unfortunately, it was now totally obscured by cloud.

Mt Agamemnon

11/ Our group now passed Mt Agamemnon and trekked south to Lake Whitham. The cloud now lifted to reveal this lovely, glacial lake. The spur line now headed to the west.

Mt Philps

12/ The cloud now returned to create these ethereal views of the distant peaks.

Mt Philps

13/ This image shows the types of vegetation that managed to grow on the less exposed sides of the peaks. This vegetation must be able to survive howling winds, heavy rain, snow and sleet.

Mt Philps

14/ This image shows a close up of one of the distant rock column.

Mt Philps

15/ This image shows two of our group walking along the spur line. We were now heading west. The closer walker has draped his rain coat over his pack. The cold wind and the rain make this a very dangerous place to linger in.

Mt Philps

16/ This image was taken only minutes after the image above. It shows how rapidly the clouds can come and go. Fortunately, our group was following a spur line and they had precise GPS coordinates to navigate by.

Mt Philps

17/ At this point the spur line turns north towards Mt Philps. They could now look south towards the distant lakes Magdalen and Millicent.

Mt Philps

18/ This image looks east along the spur line that they were following. You can see how sparse is the vegetation cover on the spur. Spur lines are also relatively easy to follow as you have obvious drops to your left and right.

Mt Philps

19/ This image show the leader pointing north along the spur line towards our next objective. Beyond this visible peak was Mt Philps. The distant rock face you can see is about one kilometer away. Beyond Mt Philps the group would rejoin the trail to the Frenchmans Cap.

Lake Gertrude

20/ This image was taken on the way up Mt Philps. It looks towards the west towards lakes Gertrude and Cecily. These lakes were 600 metres below this vantage point.

Mt Philps

21/ This image shows the spur line they were following north towards Mt Philps. It is the highest peak on the right. To give you some perspective as to the size of the rocks and the cliffs, you should note that the trees you can see here are about ten metres high.

Mt Philps

22/ One of the surprises of the journey was that at this point, when they looked back towards the south, they could still see Lake Whitham.

Mt Philps

23/ This image looks towards the west through the terrain that we were traversing.

Mt Philps

24/ The final approach to Mt Philps is over a barren, alpine plateau. The strong winds blasting over the summit prevent any trees from growing here.

Mt Philps

25/ This image looks towards the summit of Mt Philps. The desolation is caused by the freezing winds.

Mt Philps

26/ This image shows the vast panoramic view that one enjoys from the summit of Mt Philps. It looks towards the north west. One of our more intrepid walkers climbed the rock pillar to the right.

Mt Philps

27/ This image shows our leader enjoying the awesome view from the pillar at Mt Philps.

Mt Philps

28/ The spur line now diverged towards the north east and we again approached Lake Marilyn, which we had failed to see earlier in the day.

Mt Philps

29/ This image looks down from the spur line at the beginnings of a mountain stream.

Mt Philps

30/ Our journey along the spur line was relatively short in length, but the ruggedness of the terrain made it a strenuous, all day journey. This view was taken looking towards the west, as the sun was setting.

Mt Philps

31/ This view looks south down at Lake Marilyn. The original image was in deep shadow, so I had to enhance it to show you the details. Earlier in the day they had journey along the cliff line to the left, but they had failed to see anything due to the cloud. They now camped in a protected area north east of Lake Marilyn.

Frenchmans Cap

32/ Mike got up early to capture these magnificent views. The rugged landscape was now lit by the rising sun. This view looks west towards the mighty Frenchmans Cap, which was only six kilometres away.

Frenchmans Cap

33/ This view shows the god like view that you get as the sun rises. The orange colour and low lying clouds are typical for this part of Tasmania.

Frenchmans Cap

34/ As the sun rises the colours change dramatically. This view was taken as they left the spur line and approached the Frenchmans Cap Trail.

Frenchmans Cap

35/ They now had a long journey back to their bus. Fortunately, it was now all on the Frenchmans Cap Trail. I took this photo as the Frenchmans Cap receded into the distance.

Frenchmans Cap

36/ This image shows an interesting rocky outcrop east of the Loddon River.

Frenchmans Cap

37/ This was the last photo Mike took before they reached the Loddon Plains. It looks back at the rugged terrain near the Frenchmans Cap.

 

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