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MOUNT BEN NEVIS

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  • BEN NEVIS
  • Caves
  • Paradise Plains

 

Mt Ben Nevis

1/ Mt Ben Nevis is a large mountain in north eastern Tasmania. It is 1370 metres high. It dominates the skyline north of the Ben Lomond Plateau. This photo was taken from south west of Ben Nevis near the locality of Whisloca.

Mt Ben Nevis

2/ This photo looks south east towards Ben Nevis across the Sunset Ridge. This view makes Ben Nevis appear to be less high than it actually is.

Mt Ben Nevis

3/ This photo shows Ben Nevis from the track to Carr Villa. This view looks to the north.

Mt Ben Nevis

4/ This photo shows how Mt Ben Nevis dominates the skyline north of the Ben Lomond Plateau.

Mt Ben Nevis

5/ This is a telephoto view of Mt Ben Nevis. It is a peak that is usually covered in mist, which makes photography difficult. It has an air of mystery about it.

Mt Ben Nevis Tasmania

6/ The approach to Ben Nevis is through regrowth forest that is punctuated with great views of the surrounding mountains.

Mt Ben Nevis Tasmania

7/ This is logging trail to a regrowth forest. You must be careful to stay on the main trail.

Mt Ben Nevis Tasmania

8/ This shows a view of impressive distant mountains.

Mt Ben Nevis Tasmania

9/ This shows a white gum in a regrowth forest. Behind it is a great panorama of distant mountains.

Mt Ben Nevis Tasmania

10/ Misty clouds can be seen on this far off mountain.

Mt Ben Nevis Tasmania

11/ The reason this mountain was called "Saddle back" is obvious from this view.

Mt Ben Nevis Tasmania

12/ As you ascend the walk is punctuated by views of distant mountain peaks.

Mt Ben Nevis Tasmania

13/ This shows the advancing wall of mist that ended my attempt to ascend the mountain.

 

path

1/ The club has asked me not to give the location of these photos, as they fear that the caves shown below may be vandalized. I can only say that the location is in north eastern Tasmania.

pond

2/ I love this combination of pond, trees and horizon.

rock

3/ You can see from the walkers that the rock behind them is about 20 metres high.

rock

4/ In the centre of this photo is one of the caves. The red in the centre is the back of a walker. This walker should give you some size perspective.

rock

5/ Again the walkers in this photo should give you some idea of the size of this rock. The hollows are caves.

rock

6/ This pyramid was huge. I estimated that it was about 50 metres to the summit from where I was standing.

rock

7/ This cave is about 3 times the height of a man. You can see the chalk like interior of the caves.

cave

8/ The combination of rock and vegetation make this look like a piece of abstract art.

cave

9/ I love these light and dark colours. Again it looks like a piece of abstract art. This cave entrance was about the height of a man.

cave

10/ This cave was also about the height of a man.

cave

11/ I was surprised to find that the inside of the cave consisted of a white chalk like rock. The entrance to the right was about half the height of a man.

 

Paradise Plains

1/ The Paradise Plains are in north eastern Tasmania, north of Mt Ben Nevis. This area has been heavily logged over many decades, but there are still a number of outstanding natural attractions in this area, including a grove of ancient, giant, myrtle trees.

Ben Nevis from the Paradise Plains

2/ Despite the logging over many decades, there is still a large variety of plants and tree species to be seen in the Paradise Plains. This view looks to the south across a logged area towards Mt Ben Nevis.

Paradise Plains

3/ Here is our group advancing into the Paradise Plains. They are fully equipped for wet weather.

Paradise Plains

4/ In Tasmania the weather can change rapidly even in summer. This image shows the effect of a cold cloud moving across the landscape.

Paradise Plains

5/ There are large areas of open grass lands in the Paradise Plains. These are probably a consequence of the logging that has occurred here.

Paradise Plains

6/ There are also many small streams that flow into rivulets. The strange green plants on the side of this stream are cushion plants. These only grow in very wet areas.

Paradise Plains

7/ Cushion plants can form a complete carpet in some areas. Because they are sensitive, we try to avoid walking on them.

Paradise Plains

8/ There are a number of lovely, fresh water rivulets in the Paradise Plains.

Paradise Plains

9/ Some area are covered by a strange white fungus, which almost looks like snow.

Paradise Plains

10/ This image shows another version of the same white fungus. The trees here are mere saplings, as the mature trees were recently taken by loggers.

Paradise Plains

11/ One of the attractions of the Paradise Plains is this lovely, waterfall. It is about 10 metres high.

Paradise Plains

12/ Our club maintains this emergency shelter in the Paradise Plains.

Paradise Plains

13/ This image shows the strange fungus that you see growing on some myrtle trees.

Paradise Plains

14/ This was the first of the giant myrtle trees that we met. It is about 400 years old. We are fortunate that the irregular shape of these trees made then unattractive to the loggers of the past. There were once many giant eucalyptus trees in this area as well. However, their straight shape made them attractive to loggers, so they are now all gone.

Paradise Plains

15/ This myrtle tree was the largest that we found. The base diameter is about 7 metres in diameter. It had an ancient majesty about it that is difficult to describe.

Paradise Plains

16/ This myrtle tree shows the moss cover that engulfs all these trees. The hollows of these trees are used by a variety of native animals. The atmosphere of this ancient myrtle grove can only be described as ethereal. I felt that the fog really brought out the ancient feeling of this place.

Paradise Plains

17/ After visiting this enchanting, ancient myrtle grove, I understood why my European ancestors, like the Tasmanian Aborigines, once believed that these trees were inhabited by spirits.

Paradise Plains

18/ This myrtle tree was hit my lightning causing the collapse of the main trunk. However, the collapsed trunk is so large that it will take decades to decay and will be the home to many plant and animal species during this long time of decay. The rest of the tree is green, showing that these trees can recover even from this kind of major attack.

 

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