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DEVILS GULLET

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  • DEVILS GULLET
  • Mt Parmeener
  • Lake Mckenzie.

 

Devils Gullet

1/ The Devils Gullet is vast chasm from whence you can see some 30 kilometres to the south.

Devils Gullet

2/ This view looks south west of the Devils Gullet towards Barn Bluff, which is on the right horizon.

Devils Gullet Tasmania

3/ This view looks south east past Fisher Bluff, which is the nearer mountain on the left.

Devils Gullet

4/ This view looks south from the Devils Gullet towards Bran Bluff, which is on the left horizon and Cradle Mountain, which in on the right horizon. Both are more than 30 kilometres away.

Mt Achilles

5/ This view looks south east of Devils Gullet towards Mount Achilles, which is the pointed peak in the middle.

Devils Gullet Tasmania

6/ This view shows the 200 metre drop from the Devils Gullet lookout.

Devils Gullet Tasmania

7/ This view to the south east gives you some idea of the drop involved.

Devils Gullet Tasmania

8/ The scree field at the base of the Devils Gullet lookout. The "peddles" are at least as large as cars.

Devils Gullet Tasmania

9/ This view shows Mount Pelion, which is the flat mountain in the middle.

 

Mt Parmeener

1/ Mt Parmeener is in central northern Tasmania. It is south of the town of Mole Creek. This gallery shows photos made on a visit to Mt Parmeener in 2012. This image shows Mt Parmeener in the centre.

Mt Parmeener

2/ We approached Mt Parmeener from the north via Parsons Track. This track exits Parsons Road, which exits from Caveside Road, which is south east of Mole Creek. This image shows our first close up view of Mt Parmeener. The summit is 1256 metres high.

Mt Parmeener

3/ This hut on Parsons Track is used as a shelter by bush walkers.

Mt Parmeener

4/ This image shows our walkers entering the dense forest on the edge of Mt Parmeener.

Mt Parmeener

5/ This image shows the regrowth forest at the base of Mt Parmeener. This area has been extensively logged.

Mt Parmeener

6/ One of the first resting points on the walk was Haberle's Hut. It is an ancient shelter built by ancient bush walkers.

Mt Parmeener

7/ Occasionally the forest broke to reveal the panorama around us. This view looks to the west at the edge of Western Bluff and beyond it to a distant Mt Roland.

Mt Parmeener

8/ This enchanting view looks to the north at distant dairy farms engulfed in clouds. In the distance is the Gog Range. This area has some of the best dairy farms in Tasmania.

Flower on Mt Parmeener

9/ Our journey was noteworthy for the many beautiful flowers that we saw beside Parsons Track like this beautiful richea.

Flower on Mt Parmeener

10/ These colorful flowers were in great profusion.

Flower on Mt Parmeener

11/ There are so many wild flowers in the forests of Tasmania that you need to bring a botanist to identify them all.

Mt Parmeener

12/ Towards the summit our walkers had to scramble over bare rock faces.

Mt Parmeener

13/ Water erosion created these interesting patterns in these rocks.

Mt Parmeener

14/ This image was taken near the summit of Mt Parmeener and looks to the east. The first feature is Nells Bluff followed by Mother Cummings Peak. In the distance is Quamby Bluff.

Mt Parmeener

15/ This view was taken near the summit and looks to the north east.

Mt Parmeener

16/ At the top of Mt Parmeener is an alpine plateau. Here you can see our walkers walking towards the highest point.

Mt Parmeener

17/ We lunched on the highest point of Mt Parmeener. This image shows the view to the north. In the distance is the Gog Range.

Mt Parmeener

18/ This view also looks to the north and shows the steepness of the cliffs of Mt Parmeener.

Mt Parmeener

19/ This image shows more of the rugged cliffs that make up the Great Western Tier Mountains.

Mt Parmeener

20/ This view looks to the north west towards Western Bluff.

© tasphotoalbum.com/Mike Towers

21/ This view also looks to the north west past Western Bluff towards a distant Mt Roland.

Mt Parmeener

22/ We now began our journey to the south to our exit point This image looks south across the vast plateau that lay before us.

Mt Parmeener

23/ Our party then journeyed some distance to the south on the Parsons Track to a distant Lake Mckenzie. Here you can see a slither of this lake on the horizon.

Mt Parmeener

24/ This image shows a distance Lake Mckenzie. where our journey ended. You can see Lake Mckenzie. in the next gallery.

 

Lake Mackenzie

1/ Lake McKenzie is a hydro electricity lake in north western Tasmania. It is south of Mt Parmeener and east of the Devils Gullet Lookout. It can be reached from the gravel road to the Devils Gullet Lookout. Lake McKenzie is a popular fishing venue. It also has some interesting native pine forests, plus two tracks leading north beyond Mt Parmeener. This image looks east across Lake McKenzie. Beyond this distant hill is Lake Balmoral. This gallery shows photos taken on a number of separate visits to Lake McKenzie and beyond.

Lake McKenzie

2/ This image of Lake McKenzie shows the same view in the summer of 2017.

Lake Mackenzie Dam

3/ This image looks south towards the McKenzie Dam and control tower. Hydro electric dams are rarely full of water.

Lake McKenzie

4/ This is a closer view of the Lake McKenzie control tower.

Lake McKenzie

5/ This is the view from above the dam looking towards the north west. On the middle left is Mr Parmeener. It is the opposite to the view you see in photo number 3.

6/ This view looks north across Lake McKenzie towards Mt Parmeener. Parsons Track begins on the far shore that you can see.

Lake Mackenzie

7/ This image looks south east and shows the strange vegetation present in the shallows.

Lake McKenzie

8/ This image shows the rugged south eastern shore of Lake McKenzie.

Lake McKenzie

9/ These two eucalyptus trees balance this view to the south east of Lake McKenzie.

Lake Mackenzie

10/ This image looks north towards Mt Parmeener from the northern shore of Lake McKenzie. You can visit Mt Parmeener in the preceding gallery. This image shows the distinct vegetation zones that surround Lake Mckenzie. The most distant zone is a native pine forest. When it is full, the water level reaches up to the pine forest. Parsons Track starts near here and goes north over this mountain to exit on Parsons Road north of the Tiers. Below are some photos taken on Parsons Track.

Mt Parmeener

11/ This image was taken on the road to the Lake McKenzie Dam. It shows the canal, which accesses Lake McKenzie. In the distance you can see Mt Parmeener.

Mt Parmeener

12/ This image was taken on a separate trip on Parsons Track. It shows the edge of the Great Western Tiers and the rich northern coastal plain as seen from near Mt Parmeener. The distant mountain in the centre is Quamby Bluff.

Lake Mackenzie

13/ This image shows a flooded area opposite Parsons Track.

Lake Mackenzie

14/ We also saw ancient pencil pines, as we approached Mt Parmeener on Parsons Track.

Lake Mackenzie

15/ These exotic plants are cushion plants. They only grow in wet places.

Lake McKenzie

16/ These next photos were taken on a separate trip from Lake McKenzie south to Middle Lake. The track to Middle Lake exits from the Lake McKenzie Road south west of the dam. This journey passed through a variety of landscapes. Here you can see a lovely tarn. There are still patches of snow nearby even though this photo was taken in the summer.

Lake McKenzie

17/ This tarn near Middle Lake is in alpine vegetation. Beyond is a eucalyptus forest.

Lake McKenzie

18/ Middle Lake had both native pines and pencil pines on its shores.

Lake McKenzie

19/ Middle Lake had some strange shapes and contrasts. There is a deep serenity about Tasmania's alpine lakes and tarns.

Lake McKenzie

20/ This photo shows the typical terrain that we passed through near Middle Lake. Sparse grasses interspersed with groves of native pines, plus cushion plants and glacial boulders.

Lake McKenzie

21/ This is the road to Lake McKenzie. It was taken in the summer of 2017. There had been a snow drop on the night before we came. Travellers must know that it still frequently snows even in the summer in Tasmania.

Lake McKenzie

22/ This was our view as we returned from Lake McKenzie. It looks to the north west. On the left is Mt Emmett and beyond it is Barn Bluff. To the right is Cradle Mountain. You can see more photos of both Barn Bluff and Cradle Mountain on other pages.

Lake McKenzie

23/ This is the view from the Fisher River Lookout on the road to Lake McKenzie. From left to right are: Mount Massif, Mt Ossa, Mt Achilles and Mt Pelion West. These are the mountains seen by trekkers on the famous Overland Track.

Lake McKenzie

24/ This image shows Clumner Bluff, which is near the Devils Gullet. To the right are the mountains seen in the image above.

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