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HOBART CITY

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  • Hobart Dock
  • Barracks
  • HOBART CBD
  • North Hobart
  • Sydney-Hobart
  • Battery Point

 

Hobart docks

1/ In late 2010 the Hobart Docks were the host to the Wooden Boats Festival. Hundreds of wooden boats massed for the occasion and the result was a spectacular display of wood and sails.

Hobart docks

2/ All free space on the wharves was taken up by wooden boats.

Hobart docks

3/ There were also a host of activities, like this piano boat, which toured the wharves with its music.

Hobart docks

4/ Visitors were able to see the crews doing their maintenance tasks on the ships.

Hobart docks

5/ The crew were particularly busy on the Lady Nelson. This ship is a replica of an early 19th Century ship that was very important in the founding of early Tasmania.

Hobart docks

6/ Here the crew are lashing the sails down. Today they use safety harnesses, unlike in the past.

Hobart docks

7/ In the pavilions there were many activities, like these wood cutters showing their skills.

Hobart docks

8/ This wooden ship at Elizabeth Street Pier was a great example of its class.

Hobart docks

9/ These small tenders were used to take people out to the boats that could not dock at a pier.

Hobart docks

10/ This view shows the pleasure boats at the dock in normal times.

Hobart docks

11/ Ships of the Australian Navy, like these two modern destroyers, regularly dock at Hobart.

Hobart docks

12/ The Cartela is a former steam ferry that has been in service on the Derwent since the 1900s.

Hobart docks

13/ Hobart is the home port for the Aurora Australis, the supply ship for Australian Antarctica.

Hobart docks

14/ You see some very exotic, modern boats at Hobart docks, like this luxury catamaran.

Hobart Dock

15/ There are also many modern fishing boats at the Hobart Dock.

Hobart Dock

16/ This photo shows traditional trawlers that fish in the rich seas around Tasmania.

Hobart Dock

17/ There were also many old sailing ships.

Hobart docks

18/ This old survivor is the Matilda. It is a historic small fishing boat. These were common in these waters before the early 20th Century.

Hobart Dock

19/ The Windward Bound is one of the historic ships that regularly moors at Hobart.

Hobart Dock

20/ This is the ocean tug of the harbour master.

Hobart Dock

21/ The Hobart docks has retain its traditional architecture. Many have been transformed into restaurants. Note how modern Hobart is not allowed to intrude into the Docks precinct.

Hobart Dock

22/ This is the famous Salamanca Market, which is held every Saturday at the western edge of the Docks. Here you can buy a very wide range of exotic products. The area includes a whole street of retored 19th Century, industrial buildings.

Hobart Dock

23/ This photo shows the wide variety of people that you meet at the Salamanca Market.

Salamanca Market

24/ These 2 girls entertained the crowd with their violin and cello.

Salamanca Market

25/ At Salamanca is a vast modern estate of luxury apartments and restaurants.

 

Hobart Angelsea Barracks

1/ On the western edge of Battery Point, off Davey Street is Angelsea Barracks. This 200 year old barracks is the oldest of its kind in Australia and is still used by the army.

Hobart Angelsea Barracks

2/ Just beyond the entrance is this Georgian era, guard house,where red coats once stood guard.

Hobart Angelsea Barracks

3/ The main barrack would do justice to even the most prestigious, military establishments.

Hobart Angelsea Barracks

4/ This photo shows you the full size and grandeur of the main barracks.

Hobart Angelsea Barracks

5/ There are many buildings built over two centuries. The 6th Field Regiment is one of the oldest artillery units in Australia. The "Militia" refers to the old name of the modern Army Reserve.

Hobart Angelsea Barracks

6/ This Georgian building was once the commandant's residence.

Hobart Angelsea Barracks

7/ This Georgian style barracks is one of the oldest of its type in Australia.

Hobart Angelsea Barracks

8/ This old building now houses the museum. Here you can see two centuries of military history.

 

Hobart CBD

1/ On the four corners of Murray and Macquarie streets are the original colonial buildings. This is the only place in Australia where you can see so many colonial buildings together.

Hobart City

2/ This is one of the corners showing impressive, Victorian era architecture.

Hobart CBD

3/ This is another one of the corners Murray and Macquarie streets.

St Davids Hobart City

4/ This is the tower of St Davids Cathedral. Once it would have towered over the city.

St Davids Hobart City

5/ This view shows the full dimensions of St Davids Cathedral.

St Davids Hobart City

6/ St Davids is replete with beautiful stain glass windows.

St Davids Hobart City

7/ This view shows the view down to the main altar of St David's Cathedral.

Hobart CBD

5/ Macquarie Street also boasts some stylish modern architecture and grand old buildings.

Hobart City

6/ This is the portico of the Maritime Museum in Davey Street. It shows Italianate influence.

Hobart CBD

7/ These are other Victorian buildings of showing many styles in Macquarie Street.

town hall Hobart City

8/ The Hobart Post Office in Macquarie Street is a grand, old, Victorian building.

Hobart CBD

9/ This white building in Davey Street is an interesting example the Art Deco style.

Hobart CBD

10/ In the heart of the CBD is Franklin Square Park, where Governor Franklin is honoured.

Hobart City

11/ Collins Street is the northern edge of the Hobart CBD. It hosts a variety of building styles.

Hobart City

12/ Also in the heart of the CBD is the Elizabeth Street Mall, which hosts many fine shops.

cat & Fiddle Hobart City

13/ The Cat & Fiddle arcade begins at the Elizabeth Street Mall. It is replete with novelty shops. On the hour this famous glockenspiel performs.

Hobart City

14/ This impressive Victorian era office complex is adjacent to Franklin Square.

Hobart City

15/ This is the old Treasury building. It has the classic style and lines of a Grecian temple.

Hobart City

16/ This is the Maritime Museum in Macquarie Street. It has many very interesting displays.

Hobart City

17/ Hobart still has a number of buildings that show the bold new style of Art Deco.

Hobart City

18/ I was fortunate to come across this Salvation Army band, who were performing to raise money for a charity.

 

North Hobart

1/ On Brisbane and Campbell Street corner is the Penitentiary Chapel. It goes back to the very beginning of Hobart and was both a chapel and a jail. Today it is a very interesting museum.

North Hobart

2/ It has a lovely clock tower at the front. However the view is obscured by trees.

North Hobart

3/ Paternoster Street looks very old English. On the hill top is the Holy Trinity Church.

North Hobart

4/ Warwick Street slopes up hill towards the Holy Trinity Church.

North Hobart

5/ The Holy Trinity Church was formerly Anglican, but it is now Greek Orthodox.

North Hobart

6/ The altar has now been decorated in a lovely, Greek Orthodox style.

North Hobart

7/ The Church has a grand old organ.

North Hobart

8/ It also has many lovely stain glass windows.

North Hobart

9/ This is the view from St Andrew's Park in Church Street. The view is full of historic character.

North Hobart

10/ This is Church Street looking down towards the CBD. The houses are full of character.

North Hobart

11/ Brisbane Street on the edge of the CBD has numerous grand, old buildings.

North Hobart

12/ Just beyond the Brooker Highway are many interesting, Victorian houses.

 

Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race 2015

1/ The Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race begins by tradition at Sydney on 26 December and then races over 1000 kilometres south to Hobart, Tasmania It is a very prestigious event and attracts entrants from all over the world. This is my photograhic record of the 2015 event. The Launceston to Hobart yacht race is run concurrently, so there is much action at Hobart at this time. The photo above shows a competitor in the Launceston to Hobart race approaching Hobart.

Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race 2015

2/ The winner of the 2015 race was the American super yacht "Comanche". This photo shows Comanche approaching Hobart Dock at about 11 pm on Monday, 28 December 2015. Comanche was escorted in my a large flotilla of boats. I was very impressed by the size of Comanche's mast. We saw in the distance a light towering over the other lights of the flotilla and knew that it must be Comanche. This photo shows Comanche shortly after she crossed the finish line and took down her spinaker.

Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race 2015

3/ A huge crowd cheered as Comanche approached her berth. The crew looked tired but very happy at being the winners. The following photos were taken the next morning and afternoon.

Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race 2015

4/ We had heard a day earlier that Comanche had damaged her rudder. We were very surprised to hear that Comanche was able to do emergency repairs at sea and continue the race. The day after the race the crew were busy repairing the damaged rudder.

Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race 2015

5/ This is a full view of Comanche at berth. The old warehouse behind Comanche is now a luxury apartment and restaurant complex. Patrons get a great view of the yachting events from these apartments and they were the venues of numerous parties.

Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race 2015

6/ This photo shows the Australian super yacht Ragamuffin, which came second and the Italian super yacht Maserati. Behind them is the Grand Chancellor Hotel. This hotel is also a great place to view events in the Derwent Estuary.

Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race 2015

7/ This is the mast of Ragamuffin. It is 44 metres tall and very high tech. I was told that Comanche's mast was 46 metres tall and that this was one of her advantages. The size of this mast really impressed me.

Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race 2015

8/ I took this photo to show the full profile of a super yacht including its massive mast.

Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race 2015

9/ The Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race attracted media coverage from all over the world.

Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race 2015

10/ This photo shows one of the later entrants in the Sydney to Hobart race. He has just crossed the finish line and taken down his spinaker. Behind him is another entrant yacht fast approaching the finish line.

Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race 2015

11/ This photo shows the crew of the same yacht preparing to dock their yacht.

Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race 2015

12/ Hobart Dock was the mooring place for a whole squadron of super yachts. All had recently finished the Sydney to Hobart race.

Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race 2015

13/ I took this photo to show the range of prestigious sponsors involved in the race.

Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race 2015

14/ I took this photo to show the range of high tech equipment that was standard on a super yacht.

Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race 2015

15/ Later that afternoon we went for a cruise on the Derwent Estuary and saw many yachts from the Launceston to Hobart race. Note how much smaller this yacht is compared to a super yacht.

Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race 2015

16/ The photo shows another entrant in the Launceston to Hobart race.

Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race 2015

17/ There was a wide variety of vessels on the Derwent Estuary that day including jetskis.

Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race 2015

18/ There were also many of these very small yachts enjoying the Derwent.

Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race 2015

19/ This is the Lady Nelson. Contrary to appearance it is not a historic ship, but is in fact a replica built in America. It does tours of the Derwent Estuary and occasionally sails to Port Davey on the wild west coast of Tasmania.

Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race 2015

20/ This modern catamaran is the Mona Roma. It takes patrons from the Hobart Dock to visit the MONA museum up the river.

Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race 2015

21/ A kayak was a great way to view the super yachts.

Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race 2015

22/ This old sailing ship was one of many that left on the Monday night to escort in Comanche.

 

Battery Point Hobart

1/ Battery Point is the historic suburb south west of the Hobart CBD. It is famous for its historic houses and buildings. The area has whole streets of 19th Century buildings, many of which are quite exotic. It is adjacent to the famous Salamanca Market and includes numerous accommodation venues, shops and restaurants. This photo shows Governor's Square, which is now a motel complex.

Battery Point Hobart

2/ This is St Ives in Sandy Bay Road. It is a historic mansion that is now a motel

Battery Point Hobart

3/ In Sandy Bay Road is this memorial to the ancient Saint George's Burial Ground. Many important things are associated with this site.

Battery Point Hobart

4/ This very impressive church is St George's. It is located on the hill in De Witt Street. Its steeple towers over Battery Point. A plaque records that it was built in 1838.

Battery Point Hobart

5/ This is Quayle Street, Battery Point. The whole street consists of 19th Century working class houses and these have been preserved to give the street great character. It flows down hill towards the bay.

Battery Point Hobart

6/ This is one of the many professional class houses that you see in Battery Point.

Battery Point Hobart

7/ Just like in the old England that they left. Battery Point has a number of historic, corner taverns.

Battery Point Hobart

8/ This house shows a number of architectural styles. These have a binding theme that make this house quite exotic.

Battery Point Hobart

9/ This is a typical working class house block, such as were common in 19th Century England.

Battery Point Hobart

10/ This is Hampden Road, which is the heart of Battery Point. It includes many exotic shops and restaurants. Just down this road at Kelly Lane there is an ancient route to the Salmanca Market and the Hobart Docks.

Battery Point Hobart

11/ This is one of the historic accommodation venues in Hampden Road.

Battery Point Hobart

12/ The residents of Hampden Road have gone to the trouble to make this a very picturesque street.

Battery Point Hobart

13/ This view looks west up Hampden Road towards Mt Wellington. De Witt Street on the left leads to the St George's Church shown above.

Battery Point Hobart

14/ This old mansion is now the Narryna Museum.

Battery Point Hobart

15/ This exotic, Georgian era cottage is opposite to Kelly Lane, which leads to the Kelly Steps and the Salamanca Market.

Battery Point Hobart

16/ At the very northern edge of Battery Point is this modern apartment area. These houses have good views of the Derwent Estuary. Just beyond here is the finish line for the yacht races.

Battery Point Hobart

17/ Battery Point ends at the Derwent Estuary. The houses in the final street have their own jetties.

Battery Point Hobart

18/ At the southern end of Battery Point is Sandy Bay with its large Marina. The large tower is the famous Wrest Point Casino. The famous actor Errol Flynn lived in Sandy Bay and once played in this area.

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