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MOUNT FIELD National Park

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Click to go to the Mt FIELD NP information page.

  • RUSSELL FALLS
  • Mt Field West
  • Mt Field East
  • Lake Newdegate

 

Russell Falls in the Mt Field National Park

1/ Russell Falls is in south eastern Tasmania, inside the famous Mt Field National Park. It is only one hour drive from Hobart. This area is also famous for two other water falls, plus some giant eucalyptus trees. There are many great walks in the Mt Field National Park. This is the view from the base of Russell Falls.

Russell Falls in the Mt Field National Park

2/ This photo shows Russell Falls from the top.

 Mt Field National Park

3/ The pathway to Russell Falls is first class and goes through a lovely fern glade.

stream at Mt Field National Park

4/ This photo shows a lovely stream near Russell Falls.

Mt Field National Park

5/ The walk to Horseshoe Falls goes the Tall Trees area, which has giant eucalyptus trees.

tall trees in the Mt Field National Park

6/ I stretched my arms in this photo to give you some idea of the girth of this giant eucalyptus tree.

trees in the Mt Field National Park

7/ This photo shows the height of these forest giants. I estimated that the tallest trees was about 80 metres high.

fallen giant in the Mt Field National Park

8/ This is a fallen forest giant. It forms a pathway about 2 metres wide to a stream in the distance.

stream in the Mt Field National Park

9/ This is a lovely stream new Horseshoe Falls. The ferns and stream give off a feeling of deep serenity.

horseshoe Falls in Mt Field National Park

10/ This is Horseshoe Falls, which is the second most visited water fall in the Mt Field National Park. It is about half an hour walk past Russell Falls. This fall does vaguely look like a horse shoe.

Mt Field National Park

11/ This photo shows the track to Lady Barron Falls. It also passes through many lovely, fern glades

lady Barron Falls in Mt Field National Park

12/ This photo shows the gushing waters of Lady Barron Falls. It was beautiful, but much smaller water fall than Russell Falls.

Mt Field Railway Station

13/ This is the Mt Field Railway Station. Until the 1960s visitors from Hobart could catch a train to the Mt Field National Park. The Russell Falls is quite close to this station.

 

Mt Field West

1/This gallery shows a trip our club made to Mt Field West in the summer of 2014. We camped out in the wilderness and then returned by the longer K Col Track. This rejoined the Tarn Shelf Track, which then returned us to the Rodway Ski Tow. This image is looking towards Mt Field West from the south west. The trip to Mt Field West is rated at hard and requires 4.5 hours to reach this mountain. It is only suitable for experienced trekkers.

© tasphotoalbum.com/Mike Towers

2/ The trip began at the Lake Dobson car park. We then ascended to the Rodway Ski Tow west of Lake Dobson. On the left is the Tarn Shelf that leads to Lake Newdegate. On the right is Lake Seal. We returned via Lake Seal the next day. Note how these alpine lakes are at different altitudes.

Mt Field West

3/ We then followed the Mt Field West Track. The first obstacle we ascended was the Rodway Range. This area has abundant alpine vegetation. This image looks towards the north. In the distant right is the Watcher peak.

Mt Field West

4/ This is a close up of the Watcher Peak. This peak is 1294 metre high dominates this area. We would come near it on our return journey.

Mt Field West

5/ This image looks north into the Lake Hayes Valley. It is a typical glacial valley. On the distant right is the Watcher Peak.

Mt Field West

6/ We then entered a large plateau with a plethora of alpine vegetation. This image was taken near Clemes Tarn. Notice how the vegetation is in distinct zones.

Mt Field West

7/ This plateau is littered with numerous ponds. This image looks to the north west.

Mt Field West

8/ This image shows how the vegetation covers the ground almost like a carpet.

Mt Field West

9/ This image looks north at Mt Field West, which is on the right. It was taken from a protected area near the Col Petersen Hut. We camped in this area that night. Our journey continued along the ridge that you can see on the left of this image.

Mt Field West

10/ I included this image to show you the plethora of brilliant flowers that we saw in this rugged alpine wilderness. This image looks towards Mt Field West.

Mt Field West

11/ This image was taken on the plateau, as we approached Mt Field West. You can see one of the route markers on the left.

Mt Field West

12/ The Mt Field West Plateau has numerous ponds and tarns. These testify to the very heavy rainfall that the mountain receives.

Mt Field West

13/ This image shows one of our trekkers checking his GPS. You need to know your exact position, as this area is frequently covered by clouds. This image looks to the north east towards the Watcher.

Mt Field West

14/ This is the rugged summit of Mt Field West. This image is looking towards the north west. The summit is 1435 metres high.

Mt Field West

15/ This image was taken from the near the summit and looks towards the cliffs of Mt Field West. It is looking towards the north west.

Mt Field West

16/ The plateau on the saddle of Mt Field West is quite flat and is covered with ponds.

Mt Field West

17/ This image shows our trekkers enjoying the vast panoramic view from the summit of Mt Field West.

Mt Field West

18/ The plain to the west is 400 metres below the summit. This image looks down the cliffs of Mt Field West at recently logged areas.

Mt Field West

19/ The view from the summit of Mt Field West is simply awesome. This view looks to the south west at the vast wilderness of the South West National Park.

Mt Field West

20/ This is another view from near a tarn on the plateau on Mt Field West. It is looking east towards the Watcher.

Mt Field West

21/ Our group now returned to the south east and camped near the Col Petersen Hut in a protected area. This image looks west towards Bunyip Creek.

Mt Field West

22/ This image was taken at sunset. It shows Bunyip Creek flowing into the Lake Hayes Valley.

Mt Field West

23/ Soon after dawn we diverted north onto the Col K Track. This track takes you close to the Watcher before diverting east towards Lake Newdegate. This image shows us crossing alpine vegetation. as we advance towards the Watcher.

Mt Field West

24/ This image looks down at a distant Lake Hayes.

Mt Field West

25/ This image shows the rugged cliffs near the Watcher.

Mt Field West

26/ This image looks east towards the Watcher.

Mt Field West

27/ We now entered a boggy are of ponds and tarns near the Newdegate Pass. This image shows a dense mat of cushion plants.

Mt Field West

28/ This image looks north east across the ponds and cushion plants of the Newdegate Pass.

Mt Field West

29/ The ponds were quite dense in some areas. We were now approaching a scree field that led out of the Newdegate Pass.

Newdegate Pass

30/ This image shows our trekkers descending a field of scree to get out of the Newdegate Pass area.

Mt Field West

31/ This image shows our first view of Lake Newdegate and a distant Twisted Tarn. You can see this area in winter in the next gallery.

Mt Field West

32/ This is the lovely Lake Newdegate. It is a typical glacial lake surrounded by mountains.

Mt Field West

33/ This image looks across Lake Newdegate framed by a pandani towards the Newdegate Pass.

Mt Field West

34/ We now journeyed north east on the Tarn Shelf Track towards Twilight Tarn. This was our first sight of the emergency hut at Twilight Tarn.

Mt Field West

35/ This is the old hut at Twilight Tarn. Many cold trekkers have found shelter here.

Mt Field West

36/ We then crossed the Broad River near Lake Webster, as we returned home.

Mt Field West

37/ We then passed near Lake Seal. This image looks across Lake Seal towards Mt Bridges, which is 1202 metres high. Soon after this were back at the Rodway Ski Tow.

 

Mt Field East

1/ This gallery shows photos made on a club trip to Mt Field East in the summer of 2014. We camped at the Mt Field National Park camping area over night before setting off the next day.

Mt Field East

2/ We then drove up Lake Dobson Road to the car park near Lake Fenton. Another car was left at the start of the Lake Nicholls Track for an easy exit on our return.

Mt Field East

3/ We then ascended through forest and scrub near Mt Seager. This image shows the rocky path that we were following.

Mt Field East

4/ This image looks back at a distant Lake Fenton from where we had begun our journey.

Mt Field East

5/ We then had to cross a large boggy area called the Windy Moor.

Mt Field East

6/ The boggy area ended, as we approached Mt Field East.

Mt Field East

7/ The beautiful sights of Tasmania are not all large. The Mount Field National Park is famous for its wealth of alpine flowers.

Mt Field East

8/ This is a scoparia. These are abundant in the Mount Field National Park.

Mt Field East

9/ This image shows our trekkers ascending Mt Field East through a vast field of scree.

Mt Field East

10/ This image shows a trekker on the summit of Mt Field East.

Mt Field East

11/ There is a vast panoramic view from the summit of Mt Field East. This image is looking to the south east.

Mt Field East

12/ This image is looking towards the farm lands to the east of the national park.

Mt Field East

13/ We then descended through forest towards Lake Nicholls.

Mt Field East

15/ This image shows our first view of a distant Lake Nicholls.

Mt Field East

16/ This is the emergency shelter at Lake Nicholls.

Lake Nicholls

17/ The area around Lake Nicholls has some interesting trees like this king billy pine.

Mt Field East

18/ Every king billy pine has its own unique shape.

 

Lake Newdegate

1/ This gallery shows photos taken on a winter trip on the Tarn Shelf Circuit in the winter of 2014. Our journey began at Lake Dobson, where we parked our bus. Our bus then moved back to the end of the Lake Nicholls Track on Lake Dobson Road for our later quick departure.

Lake Dobson

2/ There is a very large shelter at Lake Dobson. It is used by the skiiers, who ski on the nearby trails.

Lake Dobson

3/ This is the sign at Lake Dobson, where many walks start. Mt Field National Park has many attractions. Note though the walking times involved. If you are inexperienced then double these times. We were walking towards Lake Newdegate and then on to Twilight Tarn and Lake Webster. We would regain the Lake Dobson Road to end our journey.

Lake Dobson

4/ The Lake Dobson Track was on boardwalks, where these were needed. However, most track in Tasmanian national parks are very rough and many are just defined routes through the bush. You really must wear boots and expect to get these muddy.

Lake Dobson

5/ This is image is looking back at Lake Dobson from near the Rodway ski tows. You can see the first clumps of snow to the left of this rock.

Lake Dobson

6/ The road ascends for 200 metres from Lake Dobson, before you suddenly meet the ski tow. Quite suddenly the landscape becomes covered by snow. Near this point we took the Tarn Shelf Track, which heads towards Lake Newdegate.

Tarn Shelf near Lake Newdegate

7/ This shows a trekker on the Tarn Shelf boardwalk. This is a very boggy area with numerous ponds and tarns and the boardwalk was really needed.

Tarn Shelf near Lake Newdegate

8/ This image shows the boggy area that is the Tarn Shelf.

Lake Newdegate

9/ Finally we reached Lake Newdegate, which is the largest lake in this area. It was covered by a mysterious cloud.

Lake Newdegate

10/ This image shows the old hut at Lake Newdegate, where we stopped for our lunch.

Lake Newdegate

11/ This emergency shelter at Lake Newdegate has been a welcome stop for many weary trekkers.

Lake Newdegate

12/ We then continued our journey to the north east to see this distant view of the Watcher peak.

Twisted Tarn

13/ This shows our group at the next landmark, which was Twisted Tarn. You can see the tarn to the right. The snow and cloud transformed the area into a really mysterious place.

Lake Newdegate

14/ This strange sight is scree covered in snow. It makes for a very strange artistic effect, but this covering made it much harder to walk on.

Lake Newdegate

15/ This is Twilight Tarn the next tarn that we met on our journey.

Lake Newdegate

16/ This image shows a distant Lake Webster. The cloud had begun to clear by the late afternoon. We continued past Lake Webster to regain our bus on the Lake Dobson Road.

Click to go to the Mt FIELD NP information page.