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  • LEVEN CANYON
  • Gunns Plains Cave
  • Kaydale Gardens
  • Wings WLP
  • Preston Falls

 

Leven Canyon Tasmania

1/ This is the easy path to the Cruikshank's Lookout through a lovely fern forest.

Leven Canyon Tasmania

2/ This is the spectacular view from Cruikshanks lookout looking to the west.

Leven Canyon Tasmania

3/ This photo shows the enormous fall to the canyon floor 200 metres below.

Leven Canyon Tasmania

4/ This is a telephoto view of the canyon floor. The smaller rocks are as large as cars.

Leven Canyon Tasmania

5/ This long projection shows you the huge depth to the Leven River in the canyon below.

Leven Canyon Tasmania

6/ This is a telephoto view of the Leven River 200 metres below the lookout.

Leven Canyon Tasmania

7/ This long photo shows the steep heights of the canyon walls.

Leven Canyon Tasmania

9/ This photo shows the view to the west of the Canyon. The distant peaks are 20 kilometres away.

 

Gunns Plains Cave in northern Tasmania

1/ The Gunns Plains Cave is in northern Tasmania. It is south of Ulverstone and north of the Leven Canyon. The cave is called an adventure cave, because it includes steep ladders and narrow passages. Here you can see spectacular cave formations. The above photos shows a shawl formation. It had brilliant colors and seemed like a piece of cloth that was frozen in time.

Gunns Plains Cave in northern Tasmania

2/ To enter the cave you must descend a 42 step ladder.

Gunns Plains Cave in northern Tasmania

3/ Unlike many caves, Gunns Plains Cave follows a stream for much of its length. Occasionally the cave floods. If you are lucky you may see giant yabbies in the water below.

Gunns Plains Cave in northern Tasmania

4/ This massive stalagmite formation is called the wedding cake. It is more than 3 metres in diameter and many metres high. The angle of the stairs to the left is distorted in this photo.

Gunns Plains Cave in northern Tasmania

5/ This photo looks back at the massive Wedding Cake.

Gunns Plains Cave in northern Tasmania

6/ The flow of minerals that formed the Wedding Cake do look like cake icing frozen in time.

Gunns Plains Cave in northern Tasmania

7/ In the centre you can see a shawl. This is a wafer thin flow that really does like a frozen piece of cloth. To the left is a large stalagmite flow column. There is another shawl to the lower right.

Gunns Plains Cave in northern Tasmania

8/ This huge stalactite is about man size, as you can see from the stairs to the rear.. It takes thousands of years for stalactites to grown this large.

Gunns Plains Cave in northern Tasmania

9/ Here you can see a forest of stalactites hanging from the ceiling of the cave.

Gunns Plains Cave in northern Tasmania

10/ These lovely flow shawls are called the angels' wings.

Gunns Plains Cave in northern Tasmania

11/ I was quite surprise to fine these 2 fungi growing on the path floor. There are also insects, possums and glow worms in the cave.

 

Kaydale Gardens near Nietta Tasmania

1/ The Kaydale Gardens are the impressive result of the Crowden family's hard work over a generation of time. They make a great place to stop for a meal on your way driving south to the Leven Canyon. You can contact the Kaydale Gardens on (03) 6429 1293 or the Internet contact is www.kaydalelodge.com.au The Kaydale Gardens provides for country style accommodation and the sales of flowers. This photo shows the waterfall in the lovely Rockery. The guest house is in the top left corner.

Kaydale Gardens near Nietta Tasmania

2/ This is an exotic monkey puzzle tree in the Woodland area of the gardens. The Kaydale Gardens includes a very wide range of trees and exotic plants.

3/ This photo shows the pond. It is a great place to just sit and relax.

Kaydale Gardens near Nietta Tasmania

4/ Note the profusion of shapes and colours in this view.

Kaydale Gardens near Nietta Tasmania

5/ This photo shows the Pear Walk. At the right time it is covered in lovely pear blossoms. The Kaydale Gardens also bottle and sell pears.

Kaydale Gardens near Nietta Tasmania

6/ This is the Zen Garden. It is built according to Japanese principals of harmony and serenity.

Kaydale Gardens near Nietta Tasmania

7/ This photo shows the Fernery. When in bloom they look very exotic and beautiful.

Kaydale Gardens near Nietta Tasmania

8/ This shows a view through the gardens back to the Lodge. Again note the profusion of shapes and colours.

Kaydale Gardens near Nietta Tasmania

9/ This is a view from near the entrance.

Kaydale Gardens near Nietta Tasmania

10/ The Kaydale Gardens give you a chance to walk amongst some very colorful surrounds.

 

at Wings Wild Life Park

1/ Wings Wild Life Park is located south of Ulverstone in northern Tasmania. It is located on a side road west of the B17 Road that goes to the Gunns Plains Cave. The park has a large collection of animals, birds, reptiles, fish and amphibians. This photo essay includes only a minority of the animals that you can see there. This photo shows a lady park ranger holding a koala. This koala was especially tame and could be hand fed. However, you are warned not to attempt to touch Koalas, except under the supervision of a ranger, as they can scratch and bite.

 Wings Wild Life Park

2/ This is the entrance to the Wings Wild Life Park. There is a cafe and a picnic area at the entrance.

koalas at Wings Wild Life Park

3/ Wings Wild Life Park has special feeding times for the Koalas and the Tasmanian Devils. This Koala was being fed by a lady ranger, as a child was simultaneously petting it. This koala seemed to like the attention, but you are warned not to attempt to touch Koalas, when you are not being assisted by a park ranger.

Kangaroo at Wings Wild Life Park

4/ This is an eastern grey Kangaroo. These animals are native both to Tasmania and Australia. Many are killed by cars on Tasmanian roads.

Kangaroos at Wings Wild Life Park

5/ People think of kangaroos as being very active animals. In fact they spend a lot of time just sleeping in the sun shine, like this mother and her baby were doing.

Tasmanian Devil at Wings Wild Life Park

6/ This is a Tasmanian Devil. They are about the size of a cat. In this photo you can clearly see its unique red ears and white stripe. Devils spend most of their time running around their compounds sniffing the air, as this one was doing.

Tasmanian Devil at Wings Wild Life Park

7/ This is a sleeping Tasmania Devil. It looks cute and cuddly, but you are strongly warned not to attempt to touch them, as they have a very powerful bite and they are meat eaters.

wombat at Wings Wild Life Park

8/ This is a sleeping wombat. Wombats are vegetarians like kangaroos. They too spend a lot of time sleeping in their burrows.

Meerkat at Wings Wild Life Park

9/ This is a meerkat, which is a native animal of Africa. Meerkats are very social animals, who spend much of their time running around.

Guinea Pig at Wings Wild Life Park

10/ This little animal is a guinea pig. The Wings Wild Life Park had a large display of guinea pigs and also sold them as pets.

marmosets at Wings Wild Life Park

11/ This are marmosets. They are native to the rain forests of Brazil. I was impressed by their agility on the bars.

fish at Wings Wild Life Park

12/ The Wings Wild Life Park had a large display of exotic fish in its aquarium section.

at Wings Wild Life Park

13/ The Wings Wild Life Park had also a reptile section with many snakes and some lizards on display. This snake was over one metre in length.

ducks at Wings Wild Life Park

14/ The Wings Wild Life Park had a number of local birds that were free residents of the park like these Australian wood ducks. Their presence here is dictated by the fact that many animals will stay, if you offer them a free and regular meal.

swans at Wings Wild Life Park

15/ This Australian black swan was also a free resident of the Wings Wild Life Park. He was most aggressive and tried to peck me, as he was protecting a female swan with cygnets, who was swimming close by.

emus at Wings Wild Life Park

16/ These are baby emus. They are a flightless, running bird with a strange appearance. Adult emus have a grey colour. There was once a small emu that was native to Tasmania. Unfortunately, these Tasmanian emus have not been seen for many years.

emu at Wings Wild Life Park

17/ This is the unique face of an emu. I photographed it from behind a safety fence. It is important to note that emus can be aggressive. They have a lethal kick and a powerful bite, so do not approach them.

parrot at Wings Wild Life Park

18/ This beautiful pink and grey bird is one of many breeds of parrots.

bird at Wings Wild Life Park

19/ I was fortunate to be able to capture this image of this very active and beautiful bird.

parrot at Wings Wild Life Park

20/ This lovely yellow and orange bird is also a breed of parrot.

Polish Chicken at Wings Wild Life Park

21/ This is a Polish Chicken. The English name is actually a mistake, as "Gallus Domesticus" is a European wide breed of chicken.

birds at Wings Wild Life Park

22/ These lovely birds were ground dwellers.

bird at Wings Wild Life Park

23/ This is a lovely ground dwelling bird.

caravan park 25/ Just beyond the Wings Wild Life Park was a caravan park. This caravan park had access to a large field and a river. It was within walking distance of the Wings Wild Life Park.

24/ Just beyond the Wings Wild Life Park was a caravan park. This caravan park had access to a large field and a river. It was within walking distance of the Wings Wild Life Park.

Gunns Plains

25/ This photo shows the beautiful rural scenes that you see near the Wings Wild Life Park. On the horizon is the sea near Ulverstone.

 

Preston Falls

1/ Preston Falls is in north western Tasmania south west of Ulverstone. It is a series of cascades on Preston Creek. It can be accessed from C125 Preston Road south of the Preston settlement.

Preston Falls

2/ This image shows one of the lower cascades.

Preston Falls

3/ The falls are in a rain forest, where there are huge man ferns.

Preston Falls

4/ This photo shows the lower cascade. It is about 15 metres high.

Preston Falls

5/ This is a close up of the lower part of the cascade.

Preston Falls

6/ This image shows the higher part of the falls.

Preston Falls

7/ This image shows the much larger upper falls. It plunges about 60 metres into a vast chasm.

Preston Falls

8/ The image is a close up of the upper falls.

Preston Falls

9/ This image looks down from the top of the upper falls. It was dangerous to go beyond this point.

Preston Falls

10/ This image shows Preston Creek, which feeds the various cascades.

11/ This is the view to the north east of Loyetea Peak. This mountain is south west of the falls and is accessed from Loyetea Road, which diverges from B17 south of the settlement of South Riana.

Loyetea Peak

12/ This image looks south from Loyetea Peak. This peak is 706 metres high and gives a great view into the Central Highlands.

 

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