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  • WARATAH
  • Mt Bischoff
  • Whyte Hill
  • Philosopher's Falls
  • Savage River
  • St Valentines Peak
  • Mt Pearse

 

Waratah in North West Tasmania

1/ Waratah is in north west Tasmania. It was the first dedicated mining town in Tasmania and spurred on the development of other mines in western Tasmania. In the late 19th Century Waratah produced the best tin in the World. This photo looks past Waratah Falls and the Waratah River Gorge into the heart of old Waratah. There were once 10 times as many buildings, as you can see in the photo above.

Waratah falls in Waratah in North West Tasmania

2/ Waratah is the only town in Tasmania that has a waterfall in the town itself. A short walk from the town centre takes you to the base of the waterfall. I estimated that the fall was about 40 metres. There were once seven water wheels harnessing the power of this waterfall.

Waratah River Gorge in Waratah in North West Tasmania

3/ This is the view from Waratah into the Waratah River Gorge. The Mount Bischoff mine is on the extreme left. The forest is here regrowth, but it gives you some idea of how vast is the Tarkine Forest beyond.

mine vehicles in Waratah in North West Tasmania

4/ These large mining vehicles testify to the fact that the mine was recently operating. Beyond is the forest of the Waratah River Gorge.

war memorial at Waratah in North West Tasmania

5/ Waratah has its own war memorial to commemorates the many men from Waratah, who served in both world wars. Beyond is the Waratah River Gorge.

Bischoff's Hotel in Waratah in North West Tasmania

6/ Bischoff's Hotel has a great restaurant and view of the Waratah River Gorge. There were once many other grand buildings in this street.

Post Office in Waratah in North West Tasmania

7/ In 1882 Waratah gained a post office that was the hub of the north west. This second post office was built in 1913. The empty blocks around it were once replete with buildings.

water wheel in Waratah in North West Tasmania

8/ Waratah has reorganized itself to celebrate its rich mining history. This old water wheel is adjacent to a children's park.

water wheel in Waratah in North West Tasmania

9/ This water wheel looks across the Waratah Falls towards Bischoff's Hotel. On the extreme right horizon, you can see the Mount Bischoff mine.

bridge at Waratah in North West Tasmania

10/ This iron bridge over the lake was once used by mine vehicles. The empty areas of Waratah have now been organized into a vast park.

Waratah in North West Tasmania

11/ This is the heart of old Waratah. To the left is the old police station, which is now a museum. In the centre is the Atheneum Hall, which has an interesting display and to the left is a stamper mill.

Atheneum Hall in Waratah in North West Tasmania

12/ This is another view of the Atheneum Hall. The public toilet is just to the left. The recommended tour of Waratah begins here. Panels tell you the history.

Philosopher Smith's hut in Waratah in North West Tasmania

13/ This is a recent recreation of James (Philosopher) Smith's hut. He was the man who discovered tin at Mount Bischoff in 1873. The adjacent green building is the old police station cum court house, which is now the museum.

St James Church at Waratah in North West Tasmania

14/ Near Smith's Hut is St James Anglican Church, which was built in 1880. The panel near the church notes that Smith discovered tin on St Barbara's day. She is the patron saint of miners.

Waratah in North West Tasmania

15/ This view looks across the park towards the Waratah town centre. The red building is the new Art Deco style post office. The hill beyond is Mount Bischoff.

large house in Waratah in North West Tasmania

16/ This well preserved, Victorian era house shows that there were once wealthy men in Waratah.

cottage in Waratah in North West Tasmania

17/ This is one of many attractive, Victorian era cottages in Waratah.

St Valentines Peak near Waratah in North West Tasmania

18/ St Valentine's Peak dominates the eastern sky line of Waratah. This is the view, as you drive out of Waratah towards Burnie.

 

Mt Bischoff mine near Waratah in North West Tasmania

1/ Just north of Waratah is the Mount Bischoff tin mine. In the late 19th Century this was the most important tin mine in the world. From 1914 the mining was all above ground. A short walk on the Don Trail takes you to this impressive view of the open cut mine.

Mt Bischoff mine near Waratah in North West Tasmania

2/ This photo shows another view of the huge open cut mine on Mount Bischoff. The above photo is to the right of this area. It was taken from about 200 metres away.

tailings near Mt Bischoff mine near Waratah in North West Tasmania

3/ This photo shows mine tailings on Mount Bischoff. You can collect your own rock samples on the Don Trail walk.

hut near Mt Bischoff mine near Waratah in North West Tasmania

4/ This pretty historic cottage was near the Mount Bischoff Mine. The mountain on the horizon is Mount Cleveland, which is 858 metres high.

machiner near Mt Bischoff mine near Waratah in North West Tasmania

5/ Mt Bischoff is replete with rusting, mining machinery.

Mt Pearse Tasmania

6/ This is the view to the south of Mount Bischoff. On the sky line beyond towers Mount Pearse, which is 1002 metres high.

 

Whyte Hill near Waratah in North West Tasmania

1/ The Whyte Hill Lookout is located about 10 km south of Waratah on B23, the road to Corinna. From the lookout you get spectacular views of the nearby Tarkine Forest.

2/ This is a view of Mount Ramsay. It is 856 metres high and is located south of Waratah.

Whyte Hill near Waratah in North West Tasmania

3/ This is the view to the south of Whyte Hill showing the major peaks of the Tarkine. The white streak on the central horizon is the open cut of the Savage River Mine.

Whyte Hill near Waratah in North West Tasmania

4/ This is the view of the forest and peaks to the east of Whyte Hill.

Whyte Hill near Waratah in North West Tasmania

5/ This is the view across the button grass to the west of Whyte Hill.

Mount Bischoff seen from the Whyte Hill near Waratah in North West Tasmania

6/ This is a view to the north of Whyte Hill. The prominent peak is Mount Bischoff near Waratah.

 

Philosophers Falls

1/ The Philosopher's Falls is west of Waratah. The signs at the start give important information about the walk. Note the return times.

Philosophers Falls

2/ These moss covered Tarkine trees on the way to Philosopher's Falls were myrtles. The base debris really was purple.

Philosophers Falls

3/ The trunk of a fallen monarch in a fern grove. The base was over 2 metres in width.

Philosophers Falls

4/ This is the base of a fallen monarch. I estimated the dark part here to be 4 metres in girth.

Philosophers Falls

5/ The creek was fast flowing with lovely clean water that came from Philosopher's Falls.

Philosophers Falls

6/ This fungus was so alien in appearance that I could imagine that it came from another planet. Each growth was larger than two heads.

Philosophers Falls

7/ It took me a while to recognise this exotic fungus. It was as large as a human head in size.

Philosophers Falls

8/ The trees on the Philosopher's Falls Trail were dense and included myrtles and horizontals. The small size of their trunks indicated that this area was logged in recent decades.

Philosophers Falls

9/ The Philosopher's Falls Trail crossed over numerous small creeks with fast flowing, clear water.

Philosophers Falls

10/ This fast flowing creek showed that we were getting close to Philosopher's Falls.

 

Savage River Mine in North West Tasmania

1/ The Savage River Mine is located in north west Tasmania. It is just off B23, the road to Corinna. Here valuable magnetite is mined. It one of the most important mines in Tasmania. This mine should not be confused with the pristine Savage River National Park to the north and the River Savage to the south of this mine.

Savage River Mine in North West Tasmania

2/ This is the view from the B23 road of the open cut to the south west. This open cut can be seen from the Whyte Hill Lookout to the North West of this mine.

lodge at the Savage River Mine in North West Tasmania

3/ This photo shows the Savage River Lodge. The facilities were well patronized, as you can see from the cars.

Savage River Mine in North West Tasmania

4/ This photo shows a large building near the workers' temporary accommodation complex.

units at the Savage River Mine in North West Tasmania

5/ There is some permanent accommodation units for the workers of the Savage River Mine.

temporary accommodation units at the Savage River Mine in North West Tasmania

6/ Most of the accommodation at Savage River appears to be these temporary units.

 

St Valentines Peak

1/ St Valentines Peak is a mountain in north western Tasmania east of Waratah. It is 1120 metres high and rises 300 metres above the surrounding plain. This gallery shows a climb that our club did in 2012. This photo shows St Valentines Peak from the B18 Ridgley Highway.

St Valentines Peak

2/ The walking track to St Valentines Peak is accessed from a minor road that exits from the B18 Ridgley Highway south west of the settlement of Hampshire. The track climbs St Valentines Peak on the spur that runs from the north to the south of the peak. One of the first obstacles of our walkers was crossing this creek on a log supported only by a cable. Bush walking on an exposed mountain is something that should only be attempted by experienced bush walkers.

St Valentines Peak

3/ The track leads through a rain forest, where moss covers all. You can also see the horizontal branches that making exploring some forests in Tasmania almost impossible.

St Valentines Peak

4/ As we ascended the rain forest gave way to scrub and the start of the spur line of the mountain could be seen in the distance.

St Valentines Peak

5/ This photo shows a walker on the west side of the mountain climbing up to the spur.

St Valentines Peak

6/ This photo shows the view to the west. You can see how St Valentines Peak rises abruptly above the plain. The forests in this area have been subjected to extensive logging.

St Valentines Peak

7/ Our group had now reached the spur of the mountain and were approaching the highest point. The distant trig marker can be seen on the summit on the right of the photo.

St Valentines Peak

8/ Here you can see one of our group approaching the summit of St Valentines Peak.

St Valentines Peak

9/ This photo looks north along the spur at walkers approaching the summit of St Valentines Peak.

St Valentines Peak

10/ This view looks towards the east. The closer peak on the left is Mt Everett, while the peak on the right is Mount Tor. In the middle ground you can see areas being logged.

St Valentines Peak

11/ This photo looks towards the south west. The twin peaked mountain in the middle is Mt Cattley.

St Valentines Peak

12/ Our group then lunched on the south western side of St Valentines Peak. The nearest walker is using his hood to protect himself against the cold wind.

St Valentines Peak

13/ Two of our group went the final distance to a rocky outcrop on the south west of the St Valentines Peak spur. Having conquered the mountain, we then retraced our route back to our bus.

 

Mt-Pearse

1/ Mt Pearse is a peak in north west Tasmania. It is south east of Waratah. This gallery shows a climb that our club made in 2013. Mt Pearse was approached from a minor road leading west from the Murchison Highway south east of Waratah. We then bush based our way to the spur line of Mt Pearse and climbed to the south. There is no defined track to Mt Pearse, so visiting it is potentially dangerous and should only be done by experienced bush walkers.

Mt-Pearse

2/ Part of the journey involved climbing directly up the rock face. This is quite dangerous.

Mt-Pearse

3/ Here one of our group approaches the summit of Mt Pearse. It is 1002 metres high.

Mt-Pearse

4/ This photo is looking to the south east of Mt Pearse. You can see how this mountain rises abruptly from the plain.

Mt-Pearse

5/ This photo looks towards the south west of Mt Pearse. There is a parallel fold mountain to the west of Mt Pearse, which you can see to the right of this image.

Mt Pearse

6/ This photo looks towards the west of Mt Pearse at the parallel fold mountain that you can see in the image above. This fold mountain is 800 metres high.

Mt-Pearse

7/ This photo looks towards the east. The prominent double peak on the middle left is Mt Cattley.

Mt-Pearse

8/ This photo looks south at a walker approaching the summit of Mt Pearse. Mt Pearse has three other peaks, one of which you can see on the left.

Mt-Pearse

9/ This photo shows our group resting on the summit of Mt Pearse.

Mt-Pearse

10/ This photo shows the summit of Mt Pearse on the right and the two other peaks to its south on the left. The last peak on the left is called the Rocky Sugarloaf and it is 974 metres high. You can see our group approaching the summit of Mt Pearse on the right.

Mt-Pearse

11/ This photo looks from the summit to the north a peak north of the summit. Note the fold mountain beyond it that Mt Pearse is part of.

Mt-Pearse

12/ Some of our group decided to climb the next peak to the south of the summit. Here you can see them scrambling up to its summit.

Mt-Pearse

13/ After conquering Mt Pearse, our group retraced their route back to the north east and exited through a regrowth forest.

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