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Southport icon

Mt Wylly from the King Billy Saddle
Southport
Huon Valley Region
Pindars Peak from the King Billy Saddle
Southport
Huon Valley Region
Pigsty Ponds from the King Billy Saddle
Southport
Huon Valley Region
Encroaching cloud on the King Billy Saddle
Southport
Huon Valley Region
Lake Ooze below the King Billy Saddle
Southport
Huon Valley Region
Mt Wylly from the Moonlight Ridge
Southport
Huon Valley Region
Steep escarpment of the Moonlight Ridge
Southport
Huon Valley Region
Rugged Maxwell Ridge from the Pigsty Ponds
Southport
Huon Valley Region
Hills south of the Moonlight Ridge
Southport
Huon Valley Region

SOUTHPORT, Dover, Hastings, Ida Bay, Pigsty Ponds, Pindars Peak & Adamsons Peak

SOUTHPORT and DOVER are picturesque, coastal settlements in the extreme south east corner of Tasmania. This coast is famous for its bays, beaches and forests. In addition to the west of Southport are some very picturesque mountains. It is the place where Hobart people go to take a short holiday. The great attractions here include:

Nearby places are described in the REGION HUON VALLEY, SOUTH WEST NP, COCKLE CREEK, GEEVESTON and HUONVILLE pages.


View Region Huon Valley in a larger map

FACILITIES: There are shops and petrol pumps at Southport and Dover. There is some accommodation in the lower HUON VALLEY.

TOURIST information on HASTINGS CAVE the telephone is (03) 6298 3209 contact www.parks.tas.gov.au/reserves/hastings

For information on the IDA BAY RAILWAY the telephone number is (03) 6298 3110 or contact www.idabayrailway.com.au

SIGHTS: Dover is a small coastal town and the last place in the south west that you can buy petrol and supplies. Southport is a hamlet. This area is famous for its beautiful bays, beaches and forests. Both are holiday places for people from HOBART.

Southport has two additional attractions. To the east is the HASTINGS CAVE and Thermal Pool. This has been a major attraction since the 1930s. To the west is the IDA BAY RAILWAY. This is a small, restored, former, industrial railway that now takes tourist on a short trip to the coast.

ROUTE: The fastest route to both Dover and to Southport is the A6 Huon Highway that exits from the eastern side of HOBART.

Just south of GEEVESTON you can take the much longer, but beautiful, scenic, coastal route to Dover C638.

Hastings Cave is just west of Southport. The short road to Hastings Cave is gravel, but it is well maintained, so don't be deterred by it.

Click to see the LARGER PHOTO GALLERY.

  • SOUTHPORT
  • Hastings
  • Pigsty
  • Pindars
  • Adamsons
  • Ida Bay

 

Southport, Huon River, Tasmania

1/ Southport is in the extreme south eastern corner of Tasmania. It is an idyllic place. The clouds over the bay looked really magical, the day I visited it.

Southport, Huon River, Tasmania

2/ This photo shows Southport jetty with a moored fishing boat. Dover and Southport served a variety of vessels.

Southport, Huon River, Tasmania

3/ The bays were really calm that day at Southport.

Southport, Huon River, Tasmania

4/ This shows a beach near Southport at low tide.

Southport, Huon River, Tasmania

5/ There were a number of old homes in the Southport area showing that it has been occupied for a long time.

Southport, Huon River, Tasmania

6/ This very old home is a classic rich man's retreat.

 

Hastings Caves, Tasmania

1/ Hastings is in the extreme south east corner of Tasmania. The famous Hastings Caves are just west of Hastings. The photo shows the old cave house, which is no longer the entrance. The old style of the building attests to how long the caves have been an attraction.

Hastings Caves, Tasmania

2/ A raised pathway takes you to the entrance to the Hastings Caves.

Hastings Caves, Tasmania

3/ I was told by a guide that the forest near Hastings Caves had not been logged, since the 1920s. It was interesting to note that even though the forest looked healthy, there was an obvious lack of large trees in it.

Hastings Caves, Tasmania

4/ The sights of Hastings Caves included this myriad of stalactites, tastefully lit, hung from the ceiling to give this magical, wonderland effect.

Hastings Caves, Tasmania

5/ A beautiful, white shawl hung from the ceiling of one of the Hastings Caves.

Hastings Caves, Tasmania

6/ The walkway through Hastings Caves included a lot of stairways.

Hastings Caves, Tasmania

7/ Every one of the Hastings Caves was unique in its variety of formations.

Hastings Caves, Tasmania

8/ The blackness down this small unaccessible cave was a good insight into what the cave system was really like.

Hastings Caves, Tasmania

9/ In this section of the Hastings Caves, you can see stalagmites growing up from the floor. When they join up with a stalactite growing down from the ceiling, they are called a column. You can see one on the far left. Others are close to joining up.

Hastings Caves, Tasmania

10/ The giant shawl in this photo were really enchanting. Hastings Caves is truly a magical place.

 

Mt Wylly

1/ The Pigsty Ponds is a valley of beautiful lakes and tarns in south eastern Tasmania with a stupid name. The photos in this gallery were taken on a multi day trip in 2014. We stayed over night near Ida Bay and we then trekked south west on the Moonlight Ridge Track. This image was taken south west of the Pigsty Ponds. It looks north towards Lake Mountain on the left, a distant Mount Wylly in the centre and the Maxwell Ridge on the right.

Mt La Perouse

2/ We began by trekking south west on the Moonlight Ridge Track. To the south west we could see the distant, but massive peaks of the Cockscomb Ridge and Mount La Perouse.

Moonlight Ridge

3/ This is the Moonlight Ridge. We would be ascending this ridge and then following the spur line to the south west to reach the Pigsty Ponds.

Moonlight Ridge

4/ We now ascended the Moonlight Ridge. This is the view down from the Moonlight Ridge. It was snow covered at this higher level.

Moonlight Ridge

5/ We now trekked south west on the Moonlight Ridge Track. As you can see the from this image, the spur line is devoid of thick vegetation, which makes it easy to trek. To the north west of us we could see Wylly Mountain. It is the pyramid to the left and it is 1010 metres high. The Moonlight Ridge Track continues all the way to it.

Moonlight Ridge

6/ This image shows the view to the north west, as we trekked along the Moonlight Ridge.

Moonlight Ridge

7/ The weather was overcast that day, but for a brief moment the sun burst through the clouds to give this lovely view across the hills to the east towards Ida Bay.

Moonlight Ridge

8/ We now reached an area of the Moonlight Ridge called Agnetes Garden. Here there is a great view south towards the Cockscomb to the left and Mount La Perouse to the right. These mountains were covered in mist at the time.

Pigsty Ponds

9/ At last we reach a point on the Moonlight Ridge, where we could look down into the Pigsty Ponds. It is a typical glacial valley filled with lakes and tarns. This view looks north into this valley. To the right are the Reservoir Lakes and to the left are the Pigsty Ponds.

Pigsty Ponds

10/ This view looks towards the western edge of the valley of the Pigsty Ponds. It was taken as we were descending down into this valley. For those who love the wilderness the Pigsty Ponds is an enchanting place. I did, though, wonder why it has this silly name.

Pigsty Ponds

11/ We now camped over night in this sheltered valley. This was our first night in the wilderness, but we had come prepared with sleeping bags and food. If you come with the right people, the right equipment and the right weather, then you can have a safe and enjoyable experience in the Tasmanian wilderness.

Pigsty Ponds

12/ I took this photo as the sun was setting. It is looking west from the valley towards the distant Maxwell Ridge. This view would be very different in the morning.

Pigsty Ponds

13/ This image is a close up of the same Maxwell Ridge. It was taken soon after the photo above. The rugged parapet and the soft colours of the Pigsty Ponds make this a very mysterious place.

Pigsty Ponds

14/ During the night there was a light fall of snow. It transformed the Pigsty Ponds into something quite enchanting. This view is looking south east towards the Cockscomb Range. We intended to visit this area and then return to our camp for another night.

Pigsty Ponds

15/ This image shows how the snow made the landscape of the Pigsty Ponds very mysterious.

Pigsty Ponds

16/ We now visited Amdell Falls on the D'Entrecasteux River, which are south east of the Pigsty Ponds. They were an impressive sight. The drop is about 10 metres.

Pigsty Ponds

17/ We then returned to the Pigsty Ponds and explored the area around the Reservoir Lakes.

Pigsty Ponds

18/ We now camped for a second night at the Pigsty Ponds. More snow fell during this second night. This was my morning view of the rugged Maxwell Ridge. Compare this image to those of it above.

Pigsty Ponds

19/ We now trekked back to the Moonlight Ridge to go home. This was the view looking back towards the Pigsty Ponds and the Reservoir Lakes.

Pigsty Ponds

20/ This image shows pandanis with a thick layer of snow on them. All vegetation in alpine regions has to be able to survive snow and freezing winds. You too must be able to survive this, if you wish to visit the wilderness of Tasmania.

Pigsty Ponds

21/ This image was made on our return journey on the Moonlight Ridge. It is looking south west towards Lake Mountain on the right and the Maxwell Ridge on the left. In the distance is Wylly Mountain. It shows the enchanting atmosphere of the Tasmanian wilderness. We now returned to our bus at the track entrance.

 

Pindars Peak

1/ Pindars Peak is a rugged mountain spire in south eastern Tasmania. This gallery shows a trip made to it in the summer of 2015. This was a multi day trip into the wilderness of extreme south east of Tasmania. Our group first trekked to the Pigsty Ponds and the next day they continued to the south west. This image shows our final objective of "Pindars Peak".

Pigsty Ponds

2/ To reach Pindars Peak we first had to trek to the Pigsty Ponds, where we camped over night. This area is shown in the previous Pigsty Ponds Gallery, so it is not covered in this gallery. This image shows the view, as we exited the Pigsty Ponds.

Pigsty Ponds

3/ We now ascended the King Billy Saddle and trekked to the south west. This image is looking back towards the Pigsty Ponds and shows our last view of this lovely valley.

Pindars Peak

4/ This image was taken on the King Billy Saddle and is looking towards a distant Pindars Peak. The track continues along a spur line on the mountain to the right. Pindars Peak is an impressive 1230 metres high and the views from it are simply awesome.

Lake Mountain

5/ Our next objective was the summit of Lake Mountain. This peak is an impressive 1023 metres high. This image shows us celebrating our reaching the cairn. In the distance is Pindars Peak.

Lake Ooze

6/ North east of Lake Mountain is Lake Ooze. This image is looking down into Lake Ooze. Lake Mountain is casting the shadow on the left. From Lake Mountain we could see all the way to Ida Bay.

Pindars Peak

7/ We were now engulfed by a cloud. It is a very ethereal feeling to be engulfed in a "white out" and it is one of the things that you need to learn how to cope with, if you wish to visit the Tasmanian wilderness. It is easy to get lost in a white out. This image shows the approaching cloud.

Pindars Peak

8/ This image shows the spur line to a distant Pindars Peak. The track runs along this spur. Clouds were frequently sweeping over us, as we trekked onwards.

Pindars Peak

9/ This image shows the steep slopes of the mountain side that we were passing through.

Moonlight Ridge

10/ Here you can see the heavy packs that we were carrying and the kind of landscape we were advancing through. Some sections were quite rough.

Moonlight Ridge

11/ Frequently our views down from the spur line were totally obscured by cloud.

King Billy Saddle

12/ The track was sometimes very close to the cliff line.

King Billy Saddle

13/ This hardy tree is a King Billy pine. We occasionally found them on some slopes. You can see how the strong winds have destroyed it on one side.

King Billy Saddle

14/ We came to this tarn on the spur line. It shows the many colours and textures of the wilderness. The weather was now deteriorating, so we made a decision to return to the Pigsty Ponds.

King Billy Saddle

15/ There are numerous unnamed tarns in the wilderness. This image shows the mysterious atmosphere that they evoke.

Pindars Peal

16/ This was as close as we came to Pindars Peak. This sunshine was only a break in the bad weather and ominous clouds were closing in on us. You can see the kinds of vegetation that survive on the spur line. In the distance on the right is another tarn.

King Billy Saddle

17/ This image shows you the typical steep angle of the cliffs in this area. We were trekking along the relatively flat top of the spur line that you can see on the right.

My Wylly

18/ We camped over night in a sheltered area of the King Billy Saddle. This image looks north towards Mount Wylly. It was taken as the sun was setting.

Pigsty Ponds

19/ In the morning we continued our journey back towards the Pigsty Ponds. This image shows a morning view of the distant Pigsty Ponds. Our return route the Moonlight Ridge Track follows the spur line on the right.

King Billy Saddle

20/ We continued our trek north east along the spur line of the King Billy Saddle. This image is looking back towards the west. The very distant rugged mountain in the centre is Federation Peak. This is the highest mountain in Tasmania. There is a good view of it from Pindars Peak.

King Billy Saddle

21/ The easiest sections of the track are like the section that you see in this image. Note the 15 kilogram packs that we were carrying.

Maxwell Ridge

22/ By the late afternoon we were back in the Pigsty Ponds, where we would camp the night. This image is looking towards the Maxwell Ridge.

Moonlight Ridge

23/ The next morning we left the Pigsty Ponds and ascended the Moonlight Ridge to follow this track back to Ida Bay. This image looks back to Lake Mountain and the Maxwell Ridge.

Mt Wylly

24/ This image looks north from the Moonlight Ridge towards Lake Mountain on the left, a distant Mt Wylly in the centre and the Maxwell Ridge on the right. You can see a snow covered version of this same view in the Pigsty Ponds Gallery.

Moonlight Ridge

25/ This was our last view of Pindars Peak, as we trekked to the north east.

Mt Wylly

26/ This image looks from the Moonlight Ridge to the north west towards Mount Wylly and beyond.

Moonlight Ridge

27/ This image shows the vegetation cover on the Moonlight Ridge and the rugged mountains and deep valleys that we passed by.

Lune River Valley

28/ This image looks south into the valley of the Lune River. In the foreground is the Moonlight Ridge that we were trekking along.

Moonlight Ridge

29/ This image shows the terrain towards the end of the Moonlight Ridge. The foreground to the right has been lit up by a break in the clouds.

Moonlight Ridge

30/ This image shows the view towards Ida Bay, as we ascended down from the Moonlight Ridge.

 

Calf Peak

1/ Adamsons Peak is in the extreme south east of Tasmania west of Dover. This gallery shows photos taken on a trip to Adamsons Peak in 2014. This trip went beyond Adamsons Peak to other peaks, namely the Cow and Calf and then on to the Mesa. This image shows the Cow and Calf from the Mesa.

Adamsons Peak

2/ Access to Adamsons Peak is from Adamsons Track, which diverges west from Rivulet Road west of Dover. The trip to Adamsons Peak takes seven hours, but you can also do a short diversion to see the old tramway. This was a steam tram route used by loggers in the early Twentieth Century. This image shows a trekker passing one of the giant logs left by the ancient loggers.

Adamsons Peak

3/ This image shows the remnants of a bridge used by the ancient loggers. These logs have been lying down growing moss for nearly a century.

Adamsons Peak

4/ We then returned to the main track and trekked west down Adamsons Track. We passed through a recovering forest. This image shows some of the more mature trees. They have a very ancient look about them. Unfortunately, the much larger trees were taken by the ancient loggers.

Adamsons Peak

5/ This structure is the remains of a home built by the ancient loggers out of local rocks. It provided a good wind break and a good location marker.

Adamsons Peak

6/ As we ascended Adamsons Peak, we were engulfed by cloud. It is a strange, scary, even mystical experience to be engulfed in cloud. This image shows the rugged country that we were passing through on our way to Adamsons Peak.

Adamsons Peak

7/ This image shows the summit of Adamsons Peak. We would have to scramble over these boulders to reach the summit. The larger boulders are about the size of a person.

Adamsons Peak

8/ This image shows two of our trekkers at the cairn on the summit of Adamsons Peak. This peak is 1225 metres high, but, unfortunately, there were no views, because of the dense cloud cover.

Adamsons Peak

9/ Despite the freezing winds and the snow many creatures still live on Adamsons Peak This is a little gecko lizard. He was about the size of my hand.

Adamsons Peak

10/ Our group now rested on the summit. The leader on the left is carrying the map. We would be following the spur line that you can see in the distance, which is covered by cloud.

Adamsons Peak

11/ This image shows a second peak further north west of the summit of Adamsons Peak. The leader went over to it to get her bearings. She is in shorts, because trekking can make you quite warm. The golden rule is that you must always have cold weather clothing with you and you must never be far from your pack.

Adamsons Peak

12/ We now trekked to the north west towards the Calf. This is the view back to Adamsons Peak, which we had just left. We were no longer following a defined track.

Adamsons Peak

13/ This image shows the view to the north east of the spur line to the Calf. The edge of the Calf is on the left covered in cloud.

Adamsons Peak

14/ This image shows our group ascending the Calf. They had dropped their packs at the base with other trekkers in order to ease their climb to the summit of the Calf. Cloud is obscuring the summit.

Adamsons Peak

15/ This image shows the view on the west side of the Calf. After reaching the Calf we proceeded to the next objective of the Mesa.

Adamsons Peak

16/ This image shows the spur line we were following to the Mesa. This is the horizon line that you can see running from the right to the left. A burst of sunlight has lighten up this side of the hill.

Adamsons Peak

17/ This image is looking north from along the spur line to the Mesa. It shows you the kind of view you get from the high mountains, when they are not covered in cloud.

Mesa Peak

18/ This image shows the approach to the Mesa. Once again our view were obscured by cloud. These whiffs of clouds were passing over the spur line like a table cloth being pulled. It is an enchanting sight to watch clouds rolling over a mountain.

Mesa Peak

19/ Clouds come and go and towards sunset, I was able to get this great view to the west of the Mesa. The peaks and clouds gave this view a very mystical feeling. We camped over night in a sheltered area near the Mesa.

Mesa Peak

20/ This is a sunset view from the Mesa back to the Calf. You can see the spur line that we had followed on the right of this image.

Mesa Peak

21/ This image shows a morning view of the Mesa. We now began our return journey back to Dover. The trekker in the distance is carrying a 15 kilogram pack.

Mesa Peak

22/ The views that morning from the Mesa were simply awesome. This image show the view back to Dover.

Mesa Peak

23/ This was the view many hours later, as we exited Adamsons Peak. We were now following the Adamsons Track back to our bus on Rivulet Road.

Adamsons Peak

24/ We also saw some exotic flowers. Like this lovely waratah flower with its strange shape.

Mesa Peak

25/ This was a strange shaped plant that I saw on the return journey.

 

Ida Bay Railway, Tasmania

1/ The Ida Bay Railway is a tourist railway, located at Ida Bay in the extreme south east of Tasmania. This photo shows the home station of the Ida Bay Railway.

Ida Bay Railway, Tasmania

2/ When they restored the station, they had to remove an enormous amount of regrowth. The Ida Bay Railway uses a very narrow gauge.

Ida Bay Railway, Tasmania

3/ This prime mover was originally a small truck on the old Ida Bay Railway.

Ida Bay Railway, Tasmania

4/ This shows the restored rail bus, once used to transport workers and materials to the coast, when the Ida Bay Railway was used by workers.

Ida Bay Railway, Tasmania

5/ This is a prime mover used to pull the tourist cars of the Ida Bay Railway.

Ida Bay Railway, Tasmania

6/ The machines are maintained in the old, restored railway shed of the Ida Bay Railway.

Ida Bay

7/ The tiny train rattles a lot as it rumbles down the line. It was interesting the think that we were taking a tourist trip down what had once been a boring commute for the ancient mine workers.

Ida Bay

8/ This image shows the view across Ida Bay, as we rumble to the west.

Ida Bay

9/ The railway ended at Elliott Beach. This image looks across the calm waters of Jagers Bay.

Ida Bay

10/ There was once a large mine near Elliot Beach. Today only the cemetery remains of what was once a busy place. The grave stones tell the stories of the ancient miners.

Ida Bay

11/ We now walked down to Elliott Beach. We intended to walk as far east as the Southport Bluff.

Ida Bay

12/ Elliott Beach is a beautiful, white sand beach. We have many such beaches in our Tasmania.

Ida Bay

13/ Here one of our group enjoys the soft touch of the cool waters.

 

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